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Investigators Quest for Answers in Tragic New Jersey Train Crash

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(Credit: Eduardo Munoz Alvarez) The investigators seek answers of the train accident. The engineer of NJ Transit refuses to cooperate in the investigation. Investigators Quest for Answers in Tragic New Jersey Train Crash
October 2
7:17 PM 2016

National Transportation Safety Board investigators intercept and questioned the engineer on Friday because of his injuries. The engineer had survived in the deadly Hoboken train crash. He struggled and managed to lift clues from the train's black box recorders.

Authorities want to dig up why the NJ Transit commuter train with engineer Thomas Gallagher at the controls smashed through a steel-and-concrete bumper and hurtled into the station's waiting area Thursday morning. A certain woman on the platform was killed. While more than 100 others were injured. During the interview, NTSB vice chair T. Bella Dinh-Zarr said the board that the lead agency in the investigation, has been "in touch" with Gallagher, but "unfortunately, he was injured, so she scheduled an interview with him.

The vice chair of NTSB described the condition of the engineer. She said blood and urine were taken from him and sent for testing. Standard procedures in train accidents must be observed. However, a government official informed the investigators from one of the other agencies was taking part in the probe has already interviewed Gallagher thrice on Friday. This official who was unauthorized to conduct such investigation did not disclose what the engineer said, instead he described him as cooperative.

Despite of the engineer's hesitation to cooperate to the investigation, NSTB has recovered the event recorder that was locomotive at the rear of the train at the rear of the train but hasn't been able to download its data and has gone to the manufacturer for help according to Dinh-Zarrr. The event recorder contains speed and braking information. The investigators never cease to find evidence related to the accident. They were also reviewing security video from the station, setting out to inspect the nearby tracks, and gathering records on the crew.

Until now, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie had no idea what caused the accident, one thing that she is only sure of is that the train came into the station too fast. Usually more than 1000, 000 people use NJ Transit to commute from New Jersey to New York City each day. The portion of the Hoboken station remained closed Friday. The accident has raised questions of whether technology called positive control contribute to the difference if NJT had installed it.

 National Transportation Safety Board investigators intercept and questioned the engineer on Friday because of his injuries. The engineer had survived in the deadly Hoboken train crash. He struggled and managed to lift clues from the train's black box recorders.

Authorities want to dig up why the NJ Transit commuter train with engineer Thomas Gallagher at the controls smashed through a steel-and-concrete bumper and hurtled into the station's waiting area Thursday morning. A certain woman on the platform was killed. While more than 100 others were injured. During the interview, NTSB vice chair T. Bella Dinh-Zarr said the board that the lead agency in the investigation, has been "in touch" with Gallagher, but "unfortunately, he was injured, so she scheduled an interview with him.

The vice chair of NTSB described the condition of the engineer. She said blood and urine were taken from him and sent for testing. Standard procedures in train accidents must be observed. However, a government official informed the investigators from one of the other agencies was taking part in the probe has already interviewed Gallagher thrice on Friday. This official who was unauthorized to conduct such investigation did not disclose what the engineer said, instead he described him as cooperative.

Despite of the engineer's hesitation to cooperate to the investigation, NSTB has recovered the event recorder that was locomotive at the rear of the train at the rear of the train but hasn't been able to download its data and has gone to the manufacturer for help according to Dinh-Zarrr. The event recorder contains speed and braking information. The investigators never cease to find evidence related to the accident. They were also reviewing security video from the station, setting out to inspect the nearby tracks, and gathering records on the crew.

Until now, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie had no idea what caused the accident, one thing that she is only sure of is that the train came into the station too fast. Usually more than 1000, 000 people use NJ Transit to commute from New Jersey to New York City each day. The portion of the Hoboken station remained closed Friday. The accident has raised questions of whether technology called positive control contribute to the difference if NJT had installed it.

 National Transportation Safety Board investigators intercept and questioned the engineer on Friday because of his injuries. The engineer had survived in the deadly Hoboken train crash. He struggled and managed to lift clues from the train's black box recorders.

Authorities want to dig up why the NJ Transit commuter train with engineer Thomas Gallagher at the controls smashed through a steel-and-concrete bumper and hurtled into the station's waiting area Thursday morning. A certain woman on the platform was killed. While more than 100 others were injured. During the interview, NTSB vice chair T. Bella Dinh-Zarr said the board that the lead agency in the investigation, has been "in touch" with Gallagher, but "unfortunately, he was injured, so she scheduled an interview with him.

The vice chair of NTSB described the condition of the engineer. She said blood and urine were taken from him and sent for testing. Standard procedures in train accidents must be observed. However, a government official informed the investigators from one of the other agencies was taking part in the probe has already interviewed Gallagher thrice on Friday. This official who was unauthorized to conduct such investigation did not disclose what the engineer said, instead he described him as cooperative.

Despite of the engineer's hesitation to cooperate to the investigation, NSTB has recovered the event recorder that was locomotive at the rear of the train at the rear of the train but hasn't been able to download its data and has gone to the manufacturer for help according to Dinh-Zarrr. The event recorder contains speed and braking information. The investigators never cease to find evidence related to the accident. They were also reviewing security video from the station, setting out to inspect the nearby tracks, and gathering records on the crew.

Until now, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie had no idea what caused the accident, one thing that she is only sure of is that the train came into the station too fast. Usually more than 1000, 000 people use NJ Transit to commute from New Jersey to New York City each day. The portion of the Hoboken station remained closed Friday. The accident has raised questions of whether technology called positive control contribute to the difference if NJT had installed it.

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